The Mons Anderson Mansion

One of La Crosse's Most Historic Landmarks

Materials Used in the House's Construction

The original house's materials consisted of the following:

  • Buff colored stone
  • Tin roof
  • Parquet floors
  • Ornate plasterwork
  • A variety of woods
  • Wrought iron fencing
  • Walnut paneling
  • Imported marble fireplaces (six total)
  • Black walnut woodwork
  • Library fireplace built of imported English tiles
  • French plate glass windows throughout
Example of parquet flooring from the tower's fourth floor room, Photo copyright of Author.
 
 
 A snapshot of the first floor's grand foyer, including the parquet flooring in various kinds of wood, the elaborate front windows, chandelier with painted ceiling, and marble and onyx fireplace.  Photo courtesy of Author.
 

The House's Architecture...

This stone Italianate-styled house is the most architecturally significant and the most elaborate house of this style remaining in the area as well as the city of La Crosse.  Enlarged from a small cottage (now the east wing) in 1878 and surrounded by an iron fence by Mons Anderson, a successful merchant of early La Crosse, the house has remained as he constructed it.

 

Photo of the Mons Anderson House, Exterior.  Photo courtesy of: The Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

 

Additions to the house were added to the west and south in 1878.  The Mons Anderson House is a two-story stone house of multiple gable and hip roofed forms that has gable roofed entrance bays and a mansard and gable roofed three-story (technically, four story) square tower projecting from the facade.  Pedimented stone window heads, pointed arch windows on the facade, projecting window heads on the east wing, chimney crowns, a three-sided bay window in the west elevation, a balcony on the third story of the tower, gable roofed door hoods over the main double leafed entrance and over the east single door entrance, and an arcade of pointed arches forming a veranda across the facade of the west wing visually linking the tower and main entrance characterize this mid-19th century Italianate revival styled house.

 Up-close photo of the Mons Anderson House's three-story tower.  Photo courtesy of: The Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

 

The Mons Anderson House follows elements of both Italianate (Villa Style) and also influences of Gothic Revival.  The foundation of the house is stone, and the roof is composed of shingles and glazed tile; the roof's shape is multi-gabled and hipped.  The house's plan configuration is listed as "irregular."  The house has two stories, three/four with the tower.  

Other elements of the house's architecture include a tower at the front of the house (mansard and gable), as well as intersecting gable roofs with front cross gable and hip roofed rear wing.  The tower is a three-story square tower with a third story iron balcony.  There are also pointed arched windows on the front facade.  Also included are projecting window heads on the east wing and a three-sided bay window.

On the west wing, there are gable-roofed door hoods over the main double door entrance and over the east single door entrance; arcade of pointed arches forming a veranda across the facade of the west wing link the tower and main entrance.  There are also chimney crowns.

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